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「道成了肉身,住在我們中間,充充滿滿的有恩典(Charis)有真理(Alethia)。我們也見過他的榮光,正是父獨生子的榮光。」(約翰福音1:14)

Technology in Worship

I didn’t know until just now that the electronic musical instrument maker Roland values the Christian music industry so much they set up a dedicated website for worship technology: http://www.rolandinworship.ca

But something is a little disturbing when I read this from the Music Technology in Worship page:

Challenge: The keyboard player is not available for choir rehearsal.

Example: Use a digital recorder to record his performance earlier in the week and use the recording to supplement the live musicians during the rehearsal.

Okay, if digital substitutes are permissible for rehearsals, why not during live performances?

What does the physical presence of a worshipper mean anymore when we can recreate sounds that are just as good as a live performer?

Every single act of music playing, rehearsal or live, is an act of worship in the real presence of God. We need to develop a doxological theology of “now”, valuing the physical presence of the worshipping musician (i.e. right here, right now, in the present moment before God), before the convenience of technology replaces us in worship.

Now when we start having robotic musicians playing violin for us in the future…

… the interesting question becomes: Are these robots worshipping or not?


Posted in Church, Music, Posts in English, Technology, Theology.

Tagged with , , , , .


3 Responses

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  1. Leo says

    The market of Christian music is a huge pot of gold if you think about it: the supply is small because many company just want to stay politically neutral as much as possible; yet the demand is so high, especially during these times of distress, in which people need any type of spiritual up-lifting they can get. Moreover, there’re enough ignorant Christians (myself included) who thinks that any product labelled “Christian ” deserves at least a glance through the catalog.

    As for worshipping, it has always been the people, not the music, who’re worshipping God. In fact, one can worship God without music: in the forms of poetries, literatures, movies, or even simply going onto the street and yelling “God is awesome!” (of course, you’d need to watch out for cops who may think you deserves some “special attention”.)
    If the purpose of the digital recording is for the keyboarder to think he doesn’t need to be there, then it’s absolutely BS; but if the purpose of such is for the others present to prepare better and worship God with greater dedication, then it’s more than welcomed.
    The same reason why worship teams should always practice regardless of how much they think they know the songs, because the process of preparation is also part of the worship.
    In the end, it’s all about our true motives.

  2. Anson says

    “The same reason why worship teams should always practice regardless of how much they think they know the songs, because the process of preparation is also part of the worship.”

    Great line. Must be put in all worship handbooks =)

  3. Leo says

    Alas… even though I can say it, sometimes I still fall short of this minimum requirement…